Sponsors - Work
Bookshelf - Water
  • Water and Architecture
    Water and Architecture
    by Charles W. Moore
  • Architecture and Water (Architectural Design Profile)
    Architecture and Water (Architectural Design Profile)
    John Wiley & Sons
  • Deep Immersion: The Experience of Water
    Deep Immersion: The Experience of Water
    by Robert Lawrence France
  • Sensitive Chaos: The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air
    Sensitive Chaos: The Creation of Flowing Forms in Water and Air
    by Theodor Schwenk
  • Water: The Element of Life
    Water: The Element of Life
    by Theodor Schwenk, Wolfram Schwenk
  • Building for Life: Designing and Understanding the Human-Nature Connection
    Building for Life: Designing and Understanding the Human-Nature Connection
    by Stephen R. Kellert
  • Understanding Water: Developments from the Work of Theodor Schwenk
    Understanding Water: Developments from the Work of Theodor Schwenk
    by Andreas Wilkens, Michael Jacobi, Wolfram Schwenk
  • New Waterscapes: Planning, Building and Designing with Water
    New Waterscapes: Planning, Building and Designing with Water
    Birkhäuser Basel
  • Groundswell: Constructing The Contemporary Landscape
    Groundswell: Constructing The Contemporary Landscape
    by Peter Reed
  • Radical Landscapes: Reinventing Outdoor Space
    Radical Landscapes: Reinventing Outdoor Space
    by Jane Amidon, Kathryn Gustafson
  • The Blue Revolution: Land Use and Integrated Water Resources Management
    The Blue Revolution: Land Use and Integrated Water Resources Management
    by Ian Calder
  • Ecology, Community and Delight: An Inquiry into Values in Landscape Architecture
    Ecology, Community and Delight: An Inquiry into Values in Landscape Architecture
    by Ian Thompson
  • Life's Matrix: A Biography of Water
    Life's Matrix: A Biography of Water
    by Philip Ball
  • Handbook of Water Sensitive Planning and Design (Integrated Studies in Water Management and Land Development)
    Handbook of Water Sensitive Planning and Design (Integrated Studies in Water Management and Land Development)
    CRC
Links - Networking
Bookshelf - Life+Work
  • The History of Saudi Arabia
    The History of Saudi Arabia
    by Alexei Vassiliev
  • The King's Messenger: Prince Bandar bin Sultan and America's Tangled Relationship With Saudi Arabia
    The King's Messenger: Prince Bandar bin Sultan and America's Tangled Relationship With Saudi Arabia
    by David B. Ottaway, David B Ottaway
  • A Land Transformed: The Arabian Peninsula, Saudi Arabia and Saudi Aramco
    A Land Transformed: The Arabian Peninsula, Saudi Arabia and Saudi Aramco
    by William Facey; Paul Lunde; Michael McKinnon; Thomas A. Pledge
  • Discovery!: The Search for Arabian Oil
    Discovery!: The Search for Arabian Oil
    by Wallace Stegner
  • Out in the Blue: Letters from Arabia 1937-1940
    Out in the Blue: Letters from Arabia 1937-1940
    by Thomas C. Barger
  • Third Culture Kids: The Experience of Growing Up Among Worlds (Second Revised Edition)
    Third Culture Kids: The Experience of Growing Up Among Worlds (Second Revised Edition)
    by David C. Pollock, Ruth Van Reken
  • Looking for Dilmun
    Looking for Dilmun
    by Geoffrey Bibby
  • Saudi Arabia: An Environmental Overview
    Saudi Arabia: An Environmental Overview
    Taylor & Francis
  • The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Stacey International)
    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Stacey International)
    by Max Scott
  • Travellers in Arabia: British Explorers in Saudi Arabia
    Travellers in Arabia: British Explorers in Saudi Arabia
    by Eid Ai Yahya, Eid Al-yakya
  • Honey And Onions: A Life In Saudi Arabia
    Honey And Onions: A Life In Saudi Arabia
    by Frances Meade
  • Mysteries of the Desert: A View of Saudi Arabia
    Mysteries of the Desert: A View of Saudi Arabia
    by Isabel Cutler

Professionally Speaking...


Career Background

If you've read my Life page, you'll see that it has been a bit of a convoluted journey. That description also applies to my professional life, as I have been on a seemingly disconnected path there, as well. If you are interested in knowing more, and see how all of it does relate, read on...

My career started where I had spent my childhood, in Saudi Arabia. Immediately following receiving my BS Degree in Hydrology from the University of Arizona, I accepted a position in Dhahran with ARAMCO's Exploration Department where I began my foundation in water resources management through assignments in well-site geology, field hydrology, and environmental hydrology.

I was fortunate to have been involved in many intriguing and challenging projects and studies that resulted in increased awareness in matters related to water and its effective management company-wide. Water supply, quality, and treatment issues, wastewater treatment, disposal, and reuse standards development, and hazardous materials spills and disposal issues were all project areas that I participated in.

I left Arabia after working there for 6 years and landed in Florida, where I imagined it would be an easy transition in my career as a hydrologist - the State may be surrounded by water and, in general, a swamp with a few dry spots, but maintaining an adequate potable water supply is a significant problem here. However, continuing my hydrology career was not to be: the folks in charge just did not seem to recognize or be concerned enough about the situation to employ people to assist them in taking care of the resource.

Thus, career detour number one occurred when I happened upon an opportunity to get into the marine industry (ok, it is related to water) as the owner/manager of a yacht charter business. It took a lot of hard work and sacrifice, but a little company called Yachting Vacations developed into a really special organization that provided many people a chance to sail and explore the beautiful west coast of Florida. Yachting Vacations was recognized by customers (and readers of Cruising World Magazine) as a top charter company, as they voted it number one in the world in such categories as Fleet, On-site Support Services, Value, and overall Company for three years straight (1994-96). Having taken the charter company as far as I could reasonably see it going, I sold the business in 1996, when a former charter customer made me an offer I couldn't refuse.

I remained in the marine industry for an additional 8 years, providing management and consulting services. As the General Manager for Gulfstream Marine Services, a marine electronics sales and service organization serving major boat dealerships/builders in the region (and former sub-contractor to Yachting Vacations), I was able to expand the company from servicing 2 dealerships (MarineMax, Galati Yacht Sales) with 2 locations and one OEM (Manta Catamarans), to 3 dealers (added Thunder Marine) encompassing seven locations, added 2 OEM accounts (Catalina Yachts and Rivolta Marine), and increase retail sales and service. This was achieved by developing new quoting, scheduling, purchasing, and inventory systems that streamlined operations.

Following the sale of Gulfstream Marine, I was recruited by new owners of Manta Catamarans, a manufacturer of 42' sailing and 44' powered semi-custom cruising catamarans, that had recently folded, to assist getting the company back on its feet. Suffering from a lack of control in purchasing and materials management, the business was a model of inefficiency and disorganization. Beginning with establishing the first accurate bill of materials the company had had in years, I created a purchase order system that ensured accuracy and timeliness of materials orders and established good working relationships with the many (125 +/-) vendors the company relied upon for smooth operations. To assist future efforts of the company, I hired and trained a stock room manager, trained a new purchasing agent, and designed and developed a construction manual of the sailing vessel, from hull lay-up thru commissioning, for current and future reference.

Having worked myself out of a job, once again, it was time to consider the next move. With a great deal of soul searching and self evaluation, I realized that in all of the things that I had undertaken to date, I was most fulfilled when I was able to create something new that people enjoyed or benefited from. Designing and implementing were the activities that I could throw myself into, passionately, and seeing that the product was appreciated was the reward. In the marine industry, designing boats would be the logical outlet for these inclinations: but why stop there?

Cue career detour number two. To utilize these passions and interests (art and design, business, engineering, pursuit of the practical), I perceived architecture - creating environments that enhance lives and living, both in a practical, every day sense, as well as in more profound ways that affect the human spirit - as the ultimate aggregation of the all of the things that I have enjoyed in past endeavors. Thus, while I began the yacht design course at Westlawn, I also submitted my application to the School of Architecture and Community Design at the University of South Florida, in Tampa. While I waited to hear from USF/SA+CD, I proceeded to enroll as a non-degree seeking student at USF taking a couple of courses while also getting started on the Westlawn program.

In relatively short order (but not without angst while I was waiting), my application to USF/SA+CD was approved and I started school full time. Unfortunately, the obligations of class, studio time, and family required sacrificing the yacht design course for the duration of my studies at USF, but I shall return someday.

I started at USF in 2005 and received my MArch in May of 2008, earning a few awards, nominations, etc., along the way. In addition to design skills, I also developed proficiency in a variety of related drawing and graphics/presentation software, including Autodesk Architectural Desktop/Architecture (to v. 2009), InDesign and Photoshop (CS2 & CS4), and Artlantis Studio (v. 2), as well as typical utility software such as the MS Office Suite.

Architecturally, my interests lie in the areas of integrating space and place, form and function, and built structures with hardscape and landscape. Researching and paying conscientious homage to historical and vernacular influences of contextual elements is important to me, and the psychology of projects - the why of the architecture - is intriguing. Local conditions - geological, hydrological, and climatological - and other phenomenological factors are things that I enjoy exploring in schematic development and incorporating in inventive and innovative ways that are sensitive to the environment and create a dialogue between the context, the project, and the user.

Aesthetically, I have an affinity for modern, minimal yet organic approaches. The degree to which craft and attention to detail are applied in projects is important to me, and I believe that simple, clean features utilizing project-appropriate materials are at the core of engaging and inspiring design.

Developing new responses to the challenges of sustainability is an area of great interest to me, particularly with respect to water. From the time I began my hydrology education, well before the environmental "movement" was popular and mainstream, to my experience in the marine industry (where it was more accepted because people are involved in a lifestyle that truly necessitates it), my entire career has in some way been tied to responsible use and care of this resource. Water, along with solar and wind power, use of natural materials, and reuse of materials, are necessary components of what I consider and prefer to call "intelligent" design.

Water is also a phenomenon that is architecturally appealing to me. Inclusion of water in a project as a contextual element enhances the experience of the work and is something that I believe is a valuable and important goal. In carrying out my Masters Project, which addresses the connection of water to architecture, I discovered for myself new psychological aspects of experiencing water. I am excited to begin to combine my technical and my experiential knowledge of water in new projects.

To say that 2008 was not the best time to graduate and be on the street looking for work would certainly be an understatement, but who knew? I have managed to do a little consulting work, but have spent most of my time since graduation learning things not taught in school about the industry and the field. In a way, not going directly to work has benefited me by allowing me some time to ponder and reflect on what it is that I really want to do, which is something that this site explores. Had I jumped directly into a job, I would likely be hard pressed to find time to think about what was important to me and how I think I can best contribute to the field and the general community. I guess this is the silver lining...

For further information, my resume is available for your review in the Samples section, along with some of my work. Oh, and if you are asking what I think I want to be when I grow up, you would not be the only one...(neurology is interesting...)

I am currently seeking new opportunities and am available to work with individuals interested in designing a residence or work/live project, or to firms engaged in work that would be compatible. In addition, if someone finds themselves needing a little extra help these days and can use a hand on a part time or contractual basis, please consider getting in touch with me. I am able to do CAD drawing and 3D rendering, and could even be an extra set of eyes on a project if you are short-handed and can't quite justify a full time person. If you are interested, please see the Hire Me section to take the next step.